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The Student News Site of Athens Academy

The Spartan Review

The Student News Site of Athens Academy

The Spartan Review

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Did you ED anywhere? The Various Ways to Apply to College

Did you ED anywhere? The Various Ways to Apply to College

How do I apply to college? What is the common app? What does “applying early” really mean? Applying means addressing the question: “What institutions will be the best fit for me and my passions?” 

 

The pool of colleges that a student applies to is unique to that individual. When the time comes for students to apply, guidance from college counselors, friends, and family can aid when grappling with the admissions process. 

 

Current senior, Tom Hollingsworth advises students to “get an early start on everything because then school work really starts to pile up, and it’s nice to not have to worry about writing college essays on top of all of it.” 

 

A bulk of many college applications occurs on the Common App, and it allows for students to submit their ACT/SAT/PSAT scores, an essay, transcripts, AP scores, etc. in a single application form. However, many universities require additional supplements specific to their application or have applications entirely separate from the Common App (i.e. Georgetown University). The infamous “Common App essay” refers to an essay students are able to submit to many schools through a single platform, and this writing piece can depict an applicant’s character that is otherwise not evident through distinct scores or numbers. 

 

“Applying early” at its fundamental is exactly how it sounds, yet the process consists of three subgroups: Early Decision, Early Action, and Restrictive Early Action. The deadline for the students in the Class of 2024 recently passed for the Early Decision one (ED1), Early Action (EA), and Restrictive Early Action (REA).

 

From November 1st to the 15th, most ED1 applications are due, and these decisions are “binding,” meaning that when students are admitted, they are notified mid-December and are required to attend that college. Later in the admissions season, the ED2 applications, the second round of ED, are usually sent out in February. 

 

REA is prevalent at private universities and limits students from applying early to other private universities. While this process is not binding, it prevents students from applying ED1 or EA to another private institution. REA applications are due around November and released around December.

 

EA consists of an early application deadline November 1st-15th  and an early release of the admission’s decision starting in December. Being neither restrictive nor binding, the process is simply a regular decision at an earlier time. Currently, seniors are beginning to be notified by EA decisions from Georgia Tech and others. 

 

Anvesha Das, admitted to UGA early action, says, “applying EA to Georgia was a really good experience because I went into Thanksgiving knowing I had a great option and that was so comforting.”

 

In sum, students will choose the path optimal to their goals and aspirations. Whether applicants conclude to further build their application for the regular decision deadline or to submit early with the hope of an early admission, portraying commitment to education and passion will ultimately guide students to land where they can best succeed. The process can be rigorous yet rewarding and will not go without the support of others.

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About the Contributor
Nina Rutledge, News Section Editor
My name is Nina Rutledge, and this is my first year editing for the Spartan Review News section as a Junior. I was a staff writer for the Circle Voice at my old school, where I wrote articles for sports, opinions, and news. I play soccer, run cross country, and enjoy hiking and volunteering for ESP outside of school.

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